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(East Prussia.-WUTTKE, p. 21.)
Stag: Stags draw serpents from their holes by their breath, and then trample them to
death.
A wound from a stag’s horn never heals.
A stag’s horn gives warning of the evil eye and is a safeguard against its malignant
influences (Spain).
Stair: To pass another on the stairs is unlucky.
If while coming down the stairs you fall down, it forebodes some misfortune; but if you
stumble while going up, it promises a wedding.
Star: The Esthonians believe that if anyone sees a failing star on New Year’s night, he
will die or be visited by some serious illness that year. (BOECLER-KREUTZWALD, p.
73; FRAZER, G.B2., Vol. II, p. 22.)
If you point to a star, your finger will get fixed in that position. (STRACKERJAN, Vol. 1,
p. 44.)
If a shooting star takes a direction towards some particular house, it is a sign that
someone will die therein (STRACKERJAN, Vol. I, p. 23: ELWORTHY, E.E., p. 424.)
A shooting star denotes the birth of a child (Great Britain, India; cf. W. ELLIS,
Polynesian Researches2; iii, 171.)
The Moors say that shooting stars are missiles hurled by God at evil spirits to make
them desist from trying to reach heaven. (MEAKIN, The Moors, p. 353 : LANE, Mod.
Egypt., Ch. X; C. VELTEN, Sitten u. Gebr uche der Suaheli, p. 339 sq.)
When you see the first star, wish for something and say
"Star light, star bright,
First star I see to-night,
I wish I may, I wish I might
Have the wish I wish to-night"
and your wish will come to pass provided of course, that you do not divulge it to anyone.
(Eastern Massachusetts.-BERGEN, C.S., p. 69.)
When you see a shooting star, the wish you form before its disappearance will be fulfilled.
(LEAN, Vol. II, p. 280.)
In Ruthenia a shooting star is looked upon as the track of an angel flying to receive a
departed spirit, or of a righteous soul going up to heaven. In the latter case, if a wish
be uttered at the moment the star shoots by, it will go straight up with the rejoicing spirit
to the throne of God. So when a star falls the Servians say: "Someone’s light has gone
out," meaning someone is dead. (RALSTON, Songs of the Russian People, p. 116.)
"It is then (6th century B.C.) that we find stars worshipped in particular cities and that
the twelve signs of the Zodiac were believed to control the destinies of states.
Particular stars or groups of stars were worshipped in the supposed causes of fires and
such-like calamities.
In 540 B.C. there is a more detailed account of the same worship in the Tso chwen,
and at the same time, in Kwo Y , we find abundant proof that the Chinese then
believed that the various baronies of China were all controlled by particular stars" (

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Spot: If you accidentally make some ink-spots while writing, it is an omen of good luck.
In West Highland superstition, a beauty-spot cannot be resisted, hence Diarmaid
inspired masterless love by his beauty-spot. Vide Nail.
Spriggan: In Cornwall these were certain demons said to guard treasures. (HUNT, Pop.
Rem., p. 81.)
Sprite: Same as spirit; in ordinary language it denotes an elf.
Squint: It is very unlucky to meet a man who squints. (ELWORTHY, E.E., p. 32, 417.)
Squirrel: Squirrels are so charmed by snakes that they fall an easy prey to them. Vide
Ratatosk.
Saints: (See also under the first names of the saints.)
St. Alfonso di Liguori: He is believed to have had the power of preaching in church and
confessing penitents at home at the same time. (J. GARDNER, Faiths of the World.)
Vide Bilocalion.
St. Ambrose: When St. Ambrose died on Easter Eve, several newly-baptized children
claimed to have seen the holy bishop, and pointed him out to their parents, but these
with their less pure eyes could not see him (CALMET).
St. Ammonius: St. Anthony saw the soul of St. Ammonius. carried to heaven by a company
of angels, the same day the holy man died at a distance of five days’ journey in
the desert of Nitria.
St. Dunstan: St. Dunstan’s harp discoursed most enchanting music without being
struck by any player. cf. Teirtus’ Harp.
St. John: The first words of the Gospel of St. John have always. been held of great
virtue when carried on a person. These should be written upon virgin parchment,
enclosed in a goose-quill an hour before sunrise on the first Sunday in. the year.
(THIERS, Trait des Sup., Vol. I, p. 414; ELWORTHY, E.E., p. 400.)
On May 16, St. John Nepomuc is honoured in Magyar lands, by throwing his image in
the Danube, while people follow in boats, playing musical instruments, etc. (Magyar
Folklore in "Notes and Queries," 27 Dec., 1883; BASSETT, p. 415.)
St. John’s Eve: Folklore. It is believed that fasting watchers may, on this day, see the
apparitions of those doomed to die during the year come with the ministers to the
churchdoor and knock. These apparitions are the souls which come forth from their
bodies. (TYLOR, P.C., Vol. I, p. 440; RHYS, Vol. I, p. 329.)
St. Matthew’s Day (24th February): If you spin on this day, it will go ill with the geese.

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No spider will spin its web on an Irish oak.
A spider enclosed in a quill and hung round the neck will cure the ague ; in cases of
sore-eye or fever, it may be enclosed in a nut-shell and treated likewise.
The bite of a spider is venomous; they envenom whatever they touch.
Spiders will never set their webs on a cedar roof.
Spiders spin only on dark days, and have a natural antipathy for toads; they indicate
where gold is to be found.
"Une araign e au matin, c’est du chagrin,
Une araign e au midi, c’est du plaisir,
Une araign e au soir, c’est de l’espoir."
Vide Money, Spider, Soreness, Arachne. Spindle: In Italy, women were forbidden by law to walk on the high roads twirling aspindle, because this was supposed to injure the crops. (FRAZER, G.B2., Vol. II, p.
461 note; PLINY, Nat. Hist., XXVIII, 28.) Spinning: Women in childbed should not spin, lest they spin a halter for the baby.
(Franken.-WUTTKE, p. 196.) Vide St. Matthew’s Day. Spinster: Vide Last Piece, Tea, Godfather. Spirit: A supernatural, incorporeal, rational being or personality, usually regarded asimperceptible at ordinary times to the human senses, but capable of becoming visibleat will, and frequently conceived as troublesome, terrible or horrible to mankind."It faded on the crowing of the cock."
-SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet, I, 1.1
Vide Midnight. Spitting: If you spit on the first money received during the day, you will have more.
(Great Britain, India, Germany. -WUTTKE, pp. 80, 186; cf. HAZLITT, p. 560 sq.)
Cattle will thrive if you spit on their food. (Mark, Silesia.-ib.)
Great virtue is and was always believed to belong to fasting spittle, both as curative
and protective. (ELWORTHY, E.E., p. 418, quoting HERRICK, Hesperides, The
Temple.")
In Macedonia, spitting is considered a great precaution against disease. (ABBOTT, p.
110.)
The Arabs believe that human saliva can cure a multitude of diseases; further they will
spit upon a lock which cannot easily be opened. (DOUGHTY, Arab. Des., Vol. I, p.
226.) Vide Saliva, Hair.
Splashing: If a girl splashes herself while washing clothes, it forebodes that her husband
will he a drunkard. (STRACKERJAN, Vol. I, p. 45; Great Britain, U.S.A.)
Spogelse : A common name in Denmark for the Bulderbasse or the Poltergeist.

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Gebr uche der Munda Kolhs, Zeitschr. f. Ethnologie, Vol. III (1871), p. 374; M.
GRANET, La religion des Chinois, Paris, 1922, pp. 165 sq.; TYLOR, P.C.. Vol. I, p. 407;
id., Early History of Mankind, Vol. I, p. 358; CROOKE, Pop. Rel., Vol. I, p. 280;
DURKHEIM, Elementary Forms of Religious Life, p. 242; KRAFT, Travels . . . in East
Africa, p. 150; E.R.E, Demonology.
Soup: Plenty of soup eaten slowly promotes long life.
Sow: Vide Pig.
Sparks: If sparks from a burning log are thrown out into the room, troubles and anxieties
must be expected. (Greece.-LAWSON, p. 328.) Vide Death Omens.
Sparrow: The chirping of sparrows portends much rain or snowfall (ABBOTT, p. 111), or
wet weather. (INWARDS, Weather Lore, p. 168.)
Speak: If a person appears just as you are speaking about him, it is a sign that he will
live long. (Great Britain, India.)
If you forget in the middle of your speech what you wished to say, you are telling a lie.
If two persons say the same thing at the same time, they will have a fulfilment of their
desire, provided that they wish before another word is spoken.
In folktales all animals can speak.
Speaking Foxes: Vide Silver Foxes.
Spectre: An apparition, phantom, ghost, especially one of a terrifying nature or aspect.
Speed: Speed can be acquired by partaking of the flesh of a kite. cf. Sight.
Sphinx: An animal with the body of a lion and the head of a human being, which,
according to the Egyptians represented the sun. The ancient Greeks endowed the
sphinx with mysterious powers and introduced it into their mythology. It is said that in
the time of (Edipus, a sphinx used to stop passers-by on their way to Thebes, and put
certain enigmas to them; if they could not answer these enigmas, they were devoured
by the monster. It asked (Edipus the following: Qtel est l’animal qui marche a quatre
pieds le matin, a deux pieds a midi et e trois le soir?
OEdipus recognized the symbol of infancy, youth and senility in this riddle. The sphinx
furious at this, threw itself into the sea, and was never seen any more. (Petit Larousse
Illustr , p. 1602.)
Spider: The Mohammedans will never kill a spider, because they say that when
Mohammed was flying from his enemies, he hid himself in a cave, and a spider spun
its web over the entrance in order to give it an unsuspicious appearance. A lizard pointed
Mohammed out to his followers.
There are no spiders in Ireland, because St. Patrick cleared the island of all vermin.

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In Wales it is said that persons on the point of dying can hear a melodious voice
singing in the air. (OWEN, p. 305 sq.)
Soot: Flakes of soot hanging from the bars of a grate foretell the introduction of a
stranger.
A volume of soot suddenly coming down the chimney promises a letter or money.
Sophia’s Picture: Sophia’s picture, given to Mathias, turned yellow if the giver was in
danger or in temptation, and. black if she could not escape from the danger, or if she
yielded to the temptation. (MASSINGER, 1629.) cf. Bahman’s Knife, Canace’s Mirror,
Alasnam’s Mirror, Florimel’s Girdle, Ring, Bertha’s Emerald.
Soreness: Sore eyes can be cured by putting a spider in a. nut-shell, and wearing it
round the neck. (Mark.-WUTTKE, p. 165.)
St. Blaise when he was put to death, prayed that if any person suffering from a sore
throat invoked his aid, he might be God’s instrument in effecting a perfect cure. Vide
Spider, Amber.
Soul: The Tyrolese peasants believe that a good man’s soul issues from his mouth at
death like a little white cloud (WUTTKE).
In India the soul of a saint is said to leave the body in the form of a miniature radiant
being.
Among the ancient Romans, the nearest kinsmen knelt over to inhale the last breath of
the departing.
At the death of Julius Caesar, a little animal, his soul, was seen to come out of his
mouth.
Among the Seminoles of Florida, when a woman died in childbirth, the infant was held
over her face to receive her parting spirit. (FRAZER, G.B2., Vol. I, pp. 247 sq.)
In Japan the soul is said to he a small, round, black body, and is capable of having
adventures apart from the body. (GRIFFIS, M.E., p. 472.)
The Ghost-Man of the natives of the Slave Coast of Africa continues its existence after
death, and corresponds to our soul (ELLIS, The Ewe-speaking Peoples, pp. 105 sq.).
The Qor’an (Sura XXXIX) says: "God takes to Himself the souls of men at their death;
and He takes also to Himself the souls of those who do not die, while they sleep. He
keeps with Himself the souls of those whose death He has ordained, but the others he
sends back for a season. Truly herein lie signs for thoughtful men to ponder."
cf. Ethnologie du Bengale, pp. 88, 89, quoting GREGOR, p. 206; FRAZER, in Folklore
Journal, Vol. III, p. 282; id., Taboo and the Perils of the Soul; On Certain Burial
Customs, Journ. Anthrop. Inst., Vol. XV, p. 66; id., G.B2., Vol. I, p. 204; RHYS, Celtic
Folklore, p. 601; LE BRAZ, Vol. I, p. 214; LADY WILDE, p. 139; Revue Celtique, Vol.
XII, p. 425; SPENCER AND GILLEN, Native Tribes of Australia, pp. 497, 508; BUDGE,
Book of the Dead, Vol. I, p. lxii; LORD in ROTH, Vol. I, p. 217; GRAAFLAND, Die Insel
Rote, Mitteil. d. geogr. Gesells zu Jena, VIII, p. 168; MEIJMERING, Zeeden en
gewoonten . . . in Tijdsch. v. Nederl. Indi , VI, p. 363; HERTZ, la Representation collective
de la mort, Ann e Sociol., Vol. X, p. 59; JELLINGHANS, Sagen, Sitten und

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Mythology Encyclopedia 210

snese twyse, yt is a good tokyn, but yf he snese one tyme, yt is an yll syne.XXII. Yf a man lye sicke in bedde and mistrusts himself, and snese one tyme, yt is atokyn of deathe, but yf he snese twyse, he shall escape.
XXIII. A woman being very sicke, yf she snese one tyme, yt is a syne of health, but yfshe snese twyse, she shall dye.
Snorting: The snorting of a horse while on a journey prognosticates good luck. (The
Kirghis.-SCHUYLER, Vol. II, p. 29.)
Snow: Snow is caused by witches. (LEHMANN, A.Z., p. III.)
Snuffing: In China, it is said that the snuffing by a cat or a dog will partly revive a
corpse. (Chin. Volksm rchen, p. 202.) cf. Breath.
Sodomy: In Persia and in China, sodomy is superstitiously believed to be a cure for
venereal diseases. (KRAFFT-EBING, Psychopathia Sexualis, Eng. tr., p. 405.)
Soham: A monster with the head of a horse, four eyes and the body of a fiery dragon.
Sokkvabek: Norse Myth. The abode of Saga, the seeress in Asgard.
Sokotsu-wata-dzumi: Jap. Myth. "The bottom-sea-body." The chief sea-god of
Shintoism. He, Nakatsu-wata-dzumj, "middle-sea-body " and Uhatsu-wata-dzumi,
"upper-sea-body" were produced from Izanagi’s ablutions in the sea.
They are represented as forming one deity, and are much prayed to for safety from
shipwrecks and for fair winds.
Soldier: Vide War.
Sole: According to a Russian story, the sole owes its shape to the fact that the queen
of the Baltic ate one half of it, and threw the other back. (RALSTON, Russian Folklore,
p. 330.)
Some say, it was restored to life, after half of it had been eaten, by the angel Gabriel.
(BASSETT, p. 257.)
Somnambulism: Diamond produces somnambulism.
Song: Nixies and maras are said to have the power of singing enchantingly.
Singing in bed before getting up is unlucky. (Great Britain; cf. LAPHIN, in L’Intrasigeant,
No. 17, 185, 24th August, 1927, p. 2.)
If a girl sings while at meals, she will have a drunkard for her husband (Silesia.-WUTTKE,
p. 43), orit wifi bring ill luck (Great Britain), or poverty (Paris, LAPHIN, ib.)
If you sing at the table, you will have a disappointment (U.S.A.).
"Sing in the street,
Disappointment you’ll meet." U.S.A.

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Elizabeth (" Burghley Papers," Lansdowne MSS., No. 121 in the British Museum,
London; Twelfth Annual Report of the Thirteenth Club of New York, January, 1894;
LAWRENCE, Magic of the Horseshoe, pp. 212-214) were as follows:I. Yf any man talk with another about any matter and snese twice or iiij times, let himby and by arise, yf he sett, or yf he be stand, let him move himself and go straightawaywithout any stays about his business, for he shall prosper.
II. Yf he snese more than iiij times, let him staye, for it is doubtful how he shall spede.
III. Yf a man snese one or iij times, let him procede no further in any matter, but let allalone, for it shall come to nought.
IV. Yf two men do snese both at one instant, yt is a good sne, and let them go abouttheir purpose, yf that it be either by water or land, and they shall prosper.
V. To snese twyse is a good syne, but to snese once or iij times is an yll syne. Yf onecome suddenly into the house and snese one tyme, yt is a good syne.
VI. One snese in the nyght season made by any of the household betokeneth goodluck to ye house, but yf he make two sneses, yt sygnifieth domage.
VII. Trewe yt is that he who snesith takith pte = part) of the signification in this condition,
and that he pte some pte with other.
VIII. Yf that any man snese twyse iij nyghtes together, yt is a tokyn that one of thehouse shall dye, or els some greatt goodness or badness shall happen in the house.
IX. Yf a man go to dwell in a house and snese one time, lett him dwell there, but yf hesnese twyse, lett him not tarry, neither lett him dwell therein.
X. Yf a man lye awake in the bedde and snese one tyme, yt is a syne of greatt sickness
or hyndraunce.
XI. Yf a man sleape in his hedde and snese one tyme, yt betokeneth greatt trouble,
the death of some person or extreme hyndraunce in the loss of substance.
XII. Yf a man lye in his hedde and make a snese one tyme, yt is a good syne both ofhealth and lucre, but yf he sleape yt is moche better.
XIII. Yf a man snese twyse three nyghtes together, yt is a good syne whatsover he goabout.
XIV. Yf a man travell by ye ways and come to an Inne and snese twyse, lett himdepart out of ye house and go on another, or els he shall not prosper.
XV. Yf a man go forthe to seke worke and lay hands of yt and then snese one tyme,
lett him depart, leaving his work behind him, and seke worke elsewhere, and so shalldo well; but yf he snese twyse lett him take his worke and go on further.
XVI. Yf a man, after he haue made a bargayne with another for anything and thensnese one tyme, yt sygnifieth that his hargayne will not continue.
XVII. Yf a man rise betymes on a Monday mornyng out of his bedde and snese onetyme, yt is a tokyn that he shall prosper and gayne all that week, or haue some otherjoye and comoditie.
XVIII. But yf he snese twyse, yt is deane contrarie. XIX. Yf a man lose a horse or anything
els, and is stopping out of his dore to seek yt, he snese one time, yt is a tokyn beshall haue yt agayne.
XX. Yf a man rise betymes on Sonday and snese ii tymes, Vt is a good tokyn, but yfhe snese one tyme, yt is an yll tokyn.
XXI. Yf a man at ye very beginning of a dinner or supper be minded to eat, and do

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306), and by the Indians to keep away snakes.
Sneeze: Sneezing is due to demoniacal influence. (India.- CROOKE, P.R., Vol. 1, p.
240.)
To sneeze the first thing in the morning is lucky, but beware of sneezing the last thing
at night.
If you, or another person, sneeze just as you are starting on a journey, or on a mission,
you are sure to have a disappointment or to fail.
If a person sneezes on another’s back, he immediately pinches the back in order to
minimize the evil effects. (India.-CROOKE, op. Cit., I, 240.)
If you sneeze in the middle of a statement, it is a sign that you are telling the truth.
(ABBOTT, p. 113; STRACKERJAN, Vol. I, p. 31.)
To sneeze three times is most unlucky. (TYLOR, P.C., Vol. I, p. 97; BASSETT, p. 434.)
If you sneeze when I speak, it shows that I am right (Turkestan.-SCHUYLER, Vol. II, p.
29.)
At Raratonga sneezing is said to be caused by the soul returning to the body. (W. GILL,
Myths and Songs from the South Pacific, p. 177.)
Sneezing is considered to be a call of death ; therefore the middle finger and the thumb
are snapped as a charm. Sneezing with the face towards the West is considered auspicious,
but sneezing while at work is inauspicious. (India.-JACKSON, F.L.N., Vol. II, p.
54 sq.)
"Once a wish,
Twice a kiss,
Thrice a disappointment,
Four times a letter,
Five times something better."
–Popular Rhyme (Great Britain.)
If you want to sneeze and cannot, it is a sign that someone loves you but does not
dare to tell it. (Boston.-BERGEN, C.S., p. 63.)
Sneezing indicates that absent enemies are speaking about you. (Macedonia.ABBOTT,
p. 113.)
"Sneeze on Monday, sneeze for danger,
Sneeze on Tuesday, kiss a stranger,
Sneeze on Wednesday, receive a letter,
Sneeze on Thursday, something better,
Sneeze on Friday, sneeze for sorrow,
Sneeze on Saturday, see your true love to-morrow,
Sneeze on Sunday, your safety seek,
Or the devil will have you for the rest of the week."
–Crown Point. (BERGEN, C.S., p. 145; cf. HAZLITT, p.554.)
When sneezing, an evil spirit is expelled from the body.
(TYLOR, P.C., Vol. I, p. 97; LANG, Custom and Myth, p. 14.) A modern German says"Wohl sein" or "Gesundheit!" if anyone sneezes in his presence.
The act of sneezing has found different interpretations in different countries at differenttimes. The superstitions connected with sneezing in England at the time of Queen

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If you spit on a snake it will die.
People bitten by a snake can be cured by drinking beer in which ash-leaves have been
put (STRACKERJAN, Vol. I, p. 85.)
If you dream of snakes, it means you will receive some bad news. (U.S.A.-KNORTZ, p.
21.)
A snake seen in the house is a good omen; it is the guardian spirit watching over its
own. (Greece.-LAWSON, p. 328; Russia, RALSTON, The Songs of the Russians,
1872, pp. 175, 124.)
A snake’s skin worn round the head cures headache (N. Lincolnshire.)
Snakes are said to fascinate frogs, birds, etc. (ELWORTHY, E.E., p. 39 et seq.)
Hindu boatmen keep venomous serpents in their boats. If they are dull and irritable,
they will not sail; but if they are lively and good-natured, "it is thought a sign of an
extremely lucky voyage." (DE FEYNES, Voyage jusqu’ la Chine; 1630, p. 207;
M lusine, Jan., 1885; BASSETT, p. 430.)
Snakes are most poisonous on Thursday and Saturday afternoons; at these times
some non-venomous snakes become venomous. (Bengal.)
The evil effects of a snake-bite may be counteracted by a mixture of pepper and clarified
butter. (India.–JACKSON, F.L.N., Vol. I, p. 141.)
"In ancient Mexican temples the serpent symbol is frequently seen. The approaches of
the temple of El Lastillo, at Chichen in Yucatan, is guarded by a pair of huge serpent
heads, and a second pair protect the entrance to the sanctuary. Figures of serpents
also appear in the mosaic relief designs of the fa ades, and within the sanctuary walls.
So, too, in the temples of Palenque and other Mexican towns, serpents are everywhere
plentiful in the decorations and sculptures. (Quoting Amer. Antiq., Vol. XVIII, 1896, p.
141) . . . Visits from snakes are highly appreciated as auspicious events (cf.
G.GEORGEAKIS et LEON PINEAU, le Folklore de Lesbos, p. 339), and reptiles are
sure of a hospitable reception, because they are looked upon as tutelary divinities." (Dr.
R. LAWRENCE, The Magic of the Horseshoe, Boston, 1898, pp. 62 sq.).
For Snake worship among the Romans see VIRGIL, AEneid, V, 84-93; among the
Zulus and other African tribes, CALLAWAY, Religious System of the Amazulu, Pt. II, pp.
140-144, 196-200, 208-212; J. SHOOTER, The Kaffirs of Natal, p. 162; E. CASALIS,
The Basutos, p. 246; F.L.J., ii (1880), pp. 101-103; KRANT, Natur und Kulturleben der
Zulus, p. 112; DUDLEY KIND, The Essential Kaffir, pp. 85-87; W. A. ELMSLIE, Among
the Wild Ngoni, pp. 71 sq.; O. BAUMANN, Usambara und seine Nachbargebiete, pp.
141 sq. ; (SIR) H. JOHNSON, The Uganda Protectorate, Vol. II, p. 832; A. C. HOLLIS,
The Masai, pp. 307 sq.; S. L. lINDE and H. H. HINDE, The Last of the Masal, pp. 101
sq.; G. SCHWEINFURTH, The Heart of Africa, 3 ed., Vol. I, p. 55; A. VAN GENNEP,
Tabou et Tot misme a Madagascar, pp. 272 sq.; H. W. LITTLE, Madasgascar, its
History and People, pp. 86 sq.; J. ROSCOE, in Jour. Anthrop. Inst., Vol. XXXVII (1907);
Maj. J. A. MELDON, Jour. African Soc., No. XXII, p. 151; ELLIS, Ewe-speaking
Peoples, pp. 54 sq.; among the Hindus, Ethnologic du Bengale, pp. 58 sq.; FRAZER,
Adonis, Vol. I, p. 81 sq.
Vide Emerald, Squirrel, Stag, Peacock, Serpent.
Snakebane: It is a kind of flower, and is believed by the Coreans (GRIFFIS, Corea, p.

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Mythology Encyclopedia 206

Slaughter: If you pity the animals that are being slaughtered, it will prolong their death
agony. (Silesia, Wetterau.-WUTTKE, p. 138.)
Sleep: If a girl falls asleep at work, she will marry a widower. (Hanover.-WUTTKE, p.
42.)
Sleeplessness: Insomnia can be cured by leaving the shoes with the toes pointing
towards the bed. (Mark, Silesia.–WUTTKE, p. 136.)
Slippers: If you wish to forget something unpleasant, throw a slipper over your left
shoulder. (STRACKERJAN, Vol. I, p. 96; Vol. II, p. 139.)
If you leave your slippers lying on their "uppers," you are sure to have a quarrel.
(Bengal.)
In Cornwall, a slipper with the point turned up placed near the bed cures cramp.
(HUNT, Pop. Rem., p. 409.) cf. Shoes.
Small-pox: During a smallpox epidemic, the Japs put a notice outside their houses to
the effect that the children are absent. This is supposed to keep out the disease.
(GRIFFIS, M.E., p. 468.)
Fried mouse cures smallpox.
St. Martin of Tours, or, in extreme cases, Obla Bibi (India), may be tried by those
objecting to vaccination.
The Chinese make their children hideous on the last night of the year with paper
masks, so that the smallpox demon may pass them by. (DOOLITTLE, Vol. II, p. 316.)
Smell: If you imagine you can smell flowers, it is a sign of death (Great Britain), or the
presence of snakes in the house (India).
Smile: A corpse with a smile on its lips, forebodes another death in the family. cf. Eye.
Smok: A flying dragon which appears in the folklore of all Slavic nations.
Smrtnice: Bohemian Folklore. A woman, haggard and dressed in white, who walks
beneath the windows of a house in which someone is dying. If she sits down at the
head of the bed, all hopes of recovery are lost; but if at the foot, the invalid may recover.
cf. Banshee, Bodachun Dun, Corpse Candles, Aderyn y Corph, Edgewell Oak,
Death Warnings, Habergeis, Boaloshtsh, Ahnfrau.
Snake: In some parts of the world, snakes are not killed because they are the living
homes of some "hapless souls."
Snakes are said to be the ancestors of some families (India). [A trace of totemism?]
Snakes smell of flowers. (HAGGARD, When the World Shook, Cassell’s Pop. Ed., p.
91.)

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