Mythology Encyclopedia 155

and repeating the following doggerel verse:
"A friend, a foe,
Money to come, a journey to go."
The number of white spots on a person’s nails determine the number of years he has
to live. (Alsace-LAMBS, p. 39).
If the nails of a person suffering from fever be cut, and the parings stuck on with wax
on a neighbour’s door before sunrise, the fever will be transferred to the neighbour.
(PLINY, Nat. Hist., XXVIII, 86).
The Russian peasants place the parings of a dead person’s nails along with the body
in the grave, in the belief that the same has to climb a steep hill before reaching
Paradise. (RALSTON, Songs of the Russian People, 109; cf. FRAZER, Golden Bough,
Vol. I, p. 368sq.).
In America white spots on the nail are considered lucky.
In East Anglia spots on the thumb nail are more certain of fulfilment than the others.
According to the local doggerel:
"Spots on the fingers are sure to linger,
Spots on the thumb are sure to come."
A girl who bites her finger-nails will bring forth children with great difficulty. (Japan-
GRIFFIS, M.E., p. 469).
Finger and toe nails should be carefully destroyed, otherwise other people finding them
may perform magical operations. (Gt. Britain, France, Germany, India, etc.).
If while cutting nails, a piece springs into the fire, the owner will meet with a speedy
death; the consequences may however be averted by throwing some salt in the fire.
Nails should be trimmed just before starting on a journey, and never at night. (Japan-
GRIFFIS, M.E., p. 467).
If babies’ nails be cut before they are a year old, they will not grow.
If you cut your nails on a Monday, you will have luck all the week; but if on a Friday,
unluck (Gt. Britain), or it will bring luck and help to keep away toothaches. (Germany-WUTTKE,
pp. 12, 17).
If you throw away nail-clippings in the fire either you yourself or your house will catch
fire. (Japan-CHAMBERLAIN, T.J, Ger. tr. p. 18). Vide European.
Nail Iron: An iron coffin nail, if accidentally found, is used for various magical purposes,
such as for curing diseases, punishing thieves, catching game, etc.
Name: If two children belonging to the same family bear the same name, one of them
is sure to die. (Pomerania–WUTTKE, p. 197).
The real names of persons are often concealed, for fear that others ascertaining it, may
perform various magical operations. (FRAZER, G. B., Vol. I, p. 406 sq; CROOKE,
P.R.I., Vol. II, p. 5).
The Finns and Esthonian peasants are very loth to mention wild beasts by their proper
names, for they believe that either they will have poor sport, or that the creatures will
do them much harm. (CASTREN, Vorlesungen, p. 201; BOECLER-KREUTZWALD, p.
120).
The Kamtchatkans abstain from mentioning the names of bears, whales and wolves,

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Amphion is said to have built the walls of Thebes by the music of his lyre. Hirem and
the capital of King Arthur’s kingdom were also built to divine music. The city of Jericho
was destroyed by music. (Josh. VI, 20).
If you dream of hearing music, you will receive acceptable news.
Mussel : A fountain near the waterless sea, which purges from transgression. So called
because it is contained in a hollow stone like a mussel-shell. Those who test it enter
the water, and, if they are true men, it rises till it covers their heads three times. (DR.
BREWER, R.H., p. 760).
Musubi: A Japanese god of growth, who represents an abstract quality. (ASTON,
Shinto, p. ii), and is said to be a formidable rival of Amaterasu.
Mut: Egypt. Myth. Consort of Amon-Ra, the sun, mother of Chunsu, the moon. She is
often represented as lion headed.
Mutilation: Among various tribes, as for example the Indians of Brazil, the Australians,
the Chinese, the Japanese, etc., it is believed that the spirit or ghost of a man bears
the same mutilation as the body of the man it originally inhabited. (TYLOR, P.C., Vol. I,
p. 407; Enc. Rel. Eth. Art. Demon-Japanese. Cf. FRAZER, Golden Bough, I, 204; Id.,
On Certain Burial Customs as illustrative of the Soul, in Journ. Anthrop. Inst., Vol. XV,
p. 66; DURKHEIM, Elementary Forms of Religious Life, pp. 242 seq.; Ethnologie duBengale, p. 90; TYLOR, Early History, Vol. I p. 358, id., P.C., Vol. II, p. 230; CROOKE,
P.R. I., Vol. 1, p. 280).
Myrrha: Class. Myth. Mother of Adonis. She was afterwards changed into a myrrh tree. Myrtle: A girl engaged to be married must not plant myrtles or the wedding will be broken
off. (East Prussia-WUTTKE, p. 204). N Nachzehrer: The Vampire (q.v.) is called by this name in some parts of Germany.
(WUTTKE, p. 221). N gas: "Snakes"; the local spirits of the Hindus. Nagual: The Nagual of Central America is a kind of guardian spirit in animal form. Naiad: Class. Myth. Certain kinds of nymphs. Nail: A white spot on the thumb nail promises a present; on the index finger it denotesa friend; on the middle finger, a foe; on the ring finger, a letter or a sweetheart; on thelittle finger, a journey to go. In England this is indicated by touching the fingers in turn

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Mulkari: The Mulkari of the North-West Central Queensland is the "supernatural power
who makes everything the blacks cannot otherwise account for; he is a good, beneficent
person, and never kills anyone." He is described as "a benevolent, omnipresent,
supernatural being; anything incomprehensible." (LANG, Magic and Rel., p. 40, quoting
Mr. Roth).
Mumbo Jumbo: An African bogey, hideous and malignant, the terror of women and children.
(DR. BREWER, R.H. p. 737).
Mummy: Mummies must not be carried in a ship or some misfortune would happen; the
same applies to corpses. (STRACKERJAN, Vol. I, p. 47). Vide Corpse.
Munda: Hindu. Myth. "Bald"; the name of a demon slain by Durg .
Munkir and Nekir: Moham. Myth. Two angels of the Arabs, who examine all the dead
and torture the wicked in their graves. (LANE, A.S.M.A., p. 26).
Mura: The Muras of Bohemian folk-lore are identical with the Polish Upior and our own
Vampire (q.v.).
Murder: The spirits of murdered people must wander about on earth so long as they
would have done had they been alive (East Prussia); likewise those of people dying an
accidental death. (Tyrol, K rnihen-WUTTKE, p. 217).
It is a bad omen to see a murder, or wild animals chased by dogs, or to pass a dead
body lying on the ground. (Tibet, WADDELL, p. 135).
Muscatel: Muscatels kept in one’s pocket is a cure for boils. (STRACKERJAN, Vol. I, p.
85).
Muses: Class. Myth. Daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne. They were nine in number
and presided over the arts; they dwelt with Apollo on Mt. Parnassus. They were as follows:
Clio-the Muse of history.
Euterpe-the Muse of music.
Thalia-the Muse of comedy.
Melpomene-the Muse of tragedy.
Terpsichore-the Muse of dancing.
Erato-the Muse of elegiac poetry.
Polymnia-the Muse of lyric poetry.
Urania-the Muse of astronomy, and lastly
Calliope-the Muse of eloquence and heroic poetry
Music : Persons bitten by the tarantula are supposed to be cured by music.
If you imagine you can hear music, it is a sure sign that you are in the presence of
some well-disposed spirit (India).

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Atropos.
Moss: To cure barrenness, boil some moss growing on the Temple walls and drink the
water. (Jews of Palestine–SCHIFFER, Urqueli, II, 235).
Moth: A moth flying round you presages the arrival of a letter. (Gt. Britain).
Mother Carey’s Chicken: Vide Petrel, Albatross.
Mountain-climbing: The tongue of an eagle sewn in the collar of one’s coat makes
mountain climbing easier. (ALPENBURG, p. 384; WUTTKE, p. 164).
Mountain Mother: Same as Great Mother.
Mourning: Mourning clothes must not be exchanged for ordinary ones on a Sunday, or
someone else will die; they must neither be discarded without sufficient reason.
Mouse: Many mice signify war. (Alsace-LAMBS, p. 30).
According to some legends mice are the souls of murdered people.
If a mouse gnaws our clothes during the night, or nibbles a hole in a bag of flour
(Greece–LAWSON, p. 328), it is indicative of some impending evil, perhaps even
death.
If food which a mouse has nibbled be eaten, it will give sore throat.
A fried mouse is a specific for small-pox.
St. Gertrude and St. Huldrick ward off mice.
Suspending a live mouse by the tail before the fire and roasting it expels mice from the
house. (LEAN, Vol. II, p. 418).
In Bohemia the peasants, though they kill field mice and grey mice without scruple,
always spare white mice. If a white mouse died, the luck of the house would be gone,
and the grey mice would multiply in the house. (GR0RMANN, p. 60; FRAZER, G.B.,
Vol. II, p. 426).
Arab superstition regards a particular species of mouse as inhabited by the souls of an
extinct Israelitish tribe. (BERTHOLET, p. 39). Vide Field Mouse.
Mouth: If anything falls in the corpse’s mouth, the whole family will die. (Franken-WUTTKE,
p. 212).
Mowing: If a sexton mows the churchyard, rain is sure to come. (STRACKERJAN, Vol.
1, p. 47).
Mucus: The nasal mucus is considered by many primitive races to be a powerful
amulet. (FRAZER, Golden Bough).
Mule: Vide Foam.

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but to see it on the left hand, or to turn round and see it behind you is the contrary.
To sow under a waxing moon is beneficent for the crop.
Turn your money over when you see the new moon for the first time; it brings luck. (Gi.
Britain.)
If pregnant women look at the moon, the child will be "moon-struck." (Silesia,
Oberpfalz-WUTTKE, p. 193).
The bacon of swine killed in a waning moon will waste much in cooking.
If you see the new moon over the right shoulder, take three steps backwards and
repeat the following:
"New moon, true moon, true and bright,
If I have a lover let me dream of him to-night.
If I am to marry far, let me hear a bird cry;
If I am to marry near, let me hear a cow low;
If I am never to marry, let me hear a hammer knock. "–Tennessee.
and one of these three sounds is always heard. (BERGEN, C.S., p. 117). Vide Full-
moon.
Moonlight: He who sews by moonlight, sews his burial clothes. (STRACKERJAN, Vol. I,
p. 47).
Moon, Spots on the: In Indian superstition the spots on the moon represent Krishna
milking a cow under a spreading tree; in England, "the man in the moon."
Moonstone: It has the virtue of making trees fruitful and of curing epilepsy.
Moonstone brings luck to the owner. (U.S.A.–WILKIE COLLINS, Moonstone).
It contains in it an image of the moon, representing the increase and decrease every
month.
Moosburg: One of Freiherr von Guttingen’s castles.
Moosweiber: Same as Buschweiber.
Morana: Bohemian Folk-lore. The goddess of death. She has been identified with the
Greek Elecate. (GROHMANN, p. 6)
Moravaya panna: "Black woman"; in Slavic countries this is a frequent disguise of the
demon of pestilence.
Morgaine la Faye: "Morgaine the fairy." It is believed to the present day that she retains
Holger the Dane entranced in Avalon in company with her brother, King Arthur, and
other renowned knights.
Morpheus: Class. Myth. God of dreams, son of Night and Day.
Morta: Rom. Myth. One of the goddesses of fate. She is identical with the Greek

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Monday: Monday is an unlucky day.
Servant girls appointed on a Monday break many things. (Rhineland,Westphalia-WUTTKE,
p. 104). Vide Sunday, Wednesday.
Money: The Old Prussians furnished their dead with money to spend on his weary journey
to the spirit world; in Germany, France, China (false paper money) and Ireland this
custom is kept up to the present day.
The Russian Jews (Jew. Enc., Vol. IX, p. 598) and the Indians consider it unlucky to
dream of money.
When taking money out of a purse leave at least a coin or two in it; money attracts
money. (Grodno–Jew. Enc., Vol. IX, p. 601).
If they are compelled to give away the last piece of money they possess, the
Bohemians say: " Ty muy mily posledecku, privez mi jich na koleccku." (You my dear
last one, bring me back a cartload like you). (GROHMANN, p. 227).
If you meet a frog, it denotes that you are about to receive some money.
To see blood is lucky; it denotes money. (Gt. Britain).
It is unlucky to dream of money. (Gt. Britain, India, U.S.A.-KNORTZ, p. 43). Vide Blood,
Bubble, Cattle, Execution, Frog, Gold, Ant, Arm, Moon, Palm, Swallow, Blindness.
Money Spider: To find small spiders of a golden colour, A renea scenica, commonly
called "money spider," on one’s clothes is lucky–forebodes that you will be in receipt of
some money soon. (Gt. Britain.)
Monkey: Monkeys are believed by various nations to be the forefathers of the human
race. (cf. TYLOR, P.C., Vol. I, p. 339 etc.; DARWIN, Origin of Species.)
In Guinea monkeys found near a grave are believed to be animated by the spirits of
the dead. (WILSON, pp. 210, 218; TYLOR, P.C. Vol II, p. 7. Cf. SKEAT, Malay Magic,
pp. 184 seq.).
Monkeys paws are used as vermifuge amulets in Formosa. cf. Banmdnush, Orangutan.
Monster: The offspring of incestuous unions are monsters. (cf. GRIFFIS, M.E., p. 472).
Moon: Among the Mbocobis of South America the moon is the man and the sun his
wife. (D’ORBIGNY). An Ottawa story describes the sun and the moon as brother and
sister. (SCHOOLCRAFT). Among the Egyptians Osiris and Isis were the sun and the
moon, brother and sister, husband and wife; among the Peruvians it was the same as
with the Egyptians. (PRESCOTT). In England and in France, the sun is the man (Eng.
the sun, m., Fr. le soleil) and the moon is the woman (Eng. moon, f., Fr. la lune); in
Germany, it is the reverse. (der Mond., m., die Sonne, f).
When the "mone lies sam" on her back or when her "horns" are pointed towards the
zenith, be warned in time, for foul weather is at hand.
Foul weather may be expected when the "new moon appears with the old one in her
arms."
To see the new moon for the first time on the right hand side direct before you is lucky ;

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(See FRAzER, The Magic Art, passim.) Mithaoxta: Pers. Myth. A spirit which represented "false speech." Mithras: Pers. Myth. A god of the light of the middle zone, a defender of truth, helper of
Ahura-Mazda in his struggles with the powers of darkness.
Mitra: Vedic Myth. A celestial deity, probably the same as the Persian Mithras, who
early sank to relative unimportance.
Mnemosyne: Gr. Myth. A Titaness, daughter of Uranus, goddess of memory. She was
the mother of the Muses by Zeus.
Modu: Hind. Myth. The prince of all devils that take possession of human beings. (Dr.
BREWER, R.H.).
M en: Danish Folk-lore. The king of the elves is supposed to reside at M en. cf.
Bornholm.
Mole: Moles are blind; hence the expression, "blind as a mole." (Gt. Britain).
If a mole digs up earth in a house there will be a death therein. (STRACKERJAN, Vol.
I, p. 24).
Mole-holes are the doors of ghosts. (Silesia.–WUTTKE, p. 224).
Mole-mark: A mole on the lip is a sign of gluttony and talkativeness; on the neck it
promises wealth; on the nose it indicates that the person will be a great traveller; on
the thigh it forebodes poverty and sorrow; on the throat, health and wealth, on the
wrist, ingenuity.
A mole-mark on the arm-pits promises wealth and honour; on the ankle bespeaks modesty
in men, courage in women; on the right breast it is a sign of honesty, on the left
forebodes poverty; on the chin promises wealth; on the right ear, respect, on the left,
dishonour; on the centre of the forehead it bespeaks treachery, sullenness and untidiness;
on the right temple it forebodes you will enjoy the friendship of the great, on the
left it forebodes distress on the right foot, wisdom, on the left foot, rashness; on the
right side of the heart denotes virtue, on the left wickedness; on the knee of a man it
denotes he will have a rich wife, on the knee of a woman, she may expect a large family.
(See Ethnologie du Bengale, pp. 128, 129; LEAN, Collectanea, Vol. II, p. 312;
HAZLITT, Faiths and Folklore, pp. 413 seq.; BRAND, Observations, Vol. III, p. 254).
"Moles on the neck,
Money by the peck."
–Ohio (KNORTZ, p. 126)
Mole’s Paw: Mole’s paws are used in Gt. Britain to keep off cramp.
A mole’s paw cures toothache (F.L.R., I).

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Min: Egypt. Myth. A god of procreation, chief deity of Panopolis.
Minerva: Class. Myth. Daughter of Zeus, goddess of sagacity and arts. She presided
over all artistic works and herself excelled in the arts of embroidery, etc. Vide Arachne.
Minjika, Minjik (f.): Hindu Myth. Two beings who sprang from the seed of Rudra, which
was spilt upon a mountain. They are to be worshipped by those who desire the welfare
of children. (DOWSON, H.C.D., p. 209).
Minos: Gr. Myth. Son of Zeus and Europa, king of Crete. After his death he was made
a judge of the dead in Hades ; the other two judges were Eacus and Rhadamantos.
Vide Tabs.
Minotaur: Gr. Myth. A monster, half man and half bull, the offspring of Pasiphae (q.v.). It
was confined in the labyrinth in Crete, where it devoured the periodical tribute of seven
youths and seven maidens till it was slain by Theseus, (q.v.) who volunteered to be one
of the seven.
Miolnir: Norse Myth. The name of Thor’s hammer.
Mirror: To break a mirror denotes seven years of poverty (Pinsk, Jew. Enc., Vol. IX, p.
601; U.S.A., KNORTZ, p. 37; HAZLITT, p. 225), or bad luck (Gt. Britain, BRAND,
Observations, Vol. III, p. 169; GREGOR, p. 203).
If one looks at himself after eleven o’clock at night, he will see the reflection of the
Devil’s face beside his own. (Mosel, Tyrol-WUTTKE, p. 132; STRACKERJAN, Vol. I, p.
262; Gt. Britain, India).
A woman should not look at herself in the mirror for at least six weeks after she was
brought to childbed, lest ghostly faces peer at her. (Silesia-WUTTKE, P. 207).
If a mirror be broken, it is a warning that someone in the house will lose a friend ere
long; or is prophetic that a person will never marry; or if married, will lose the person
wedded.
A mirror falling off the wall without any apparent cause is an omen of an impending disaster
or of a death in the family. (N. & C. Germany, Tyrol–WUTTKE, p. 38; Gt. Britain).
If a mirror be held before a sleeping man during a hail or thunder-storm, the storm will
cease. (LELAND, Etruscan Roman Remains, p. 93). Vide Alasnam’s Mirror, Ts’in King,
Picture, Stuttering.
Miser: The spirits of misers must return to earth.
The name of a miser should not be uttered the first thing in the morning; if you do so,
you will have nothing to eat that day. (Bengal-TAGORE, Mashi and other Stories, p. 92,
Note I).
Mistletoe: It is no sin to kiss under the mistletoe at Christmas.
Mistletoe was the only thing on earth which had not taken an oath to do Balder harm.

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Mythology Encyclopedia 147

him bathe in the river Pactolus. For having preferred the flute of Pan to Apollo’s lyre,
Apollo made donkey’s ears grow on him.
Midgard Serpent: Norse Myth. A sea monster, the offspring of Loki.
Midnight: Ghosts and other spirits wander about at this hour.
In the dead vast and middle of the night, a figure like your father appears before them.
. .
–SHAKESPEARE, Hamlet, I, 2.
Midzuha no me: In Japan the Water was made a female deity under this name.
Milford Haven: Fairies were supposed to attend the market of Milford Haven as late as
the 19th Century.
Milk: Fairies are very fond of milk and often try to gratify their desires on "unsained" or
unchurched women. (GREGOR, Folk-lore of N.E. Scot., pp. 5, 60, 62).
All liquids spilled on the ground are supposed to go to the use of fairies. (STEWART, p.
124; DALYELL, Dark Sup., p. 193).
It is considered a very good omen in India to see milk immediately on waking up in the
morning.
Milk Tooth: Milk teeth should be swallowed, if nice, white teeth are desired. (U.S.A.,
KNORTZ, p. 99). Vide Tooth.
Mill: In Slavic and Teutonic (STRACKERJAN, Vol. II, p. 142) folk-lore, mills are believed
to be the haunts of all kinds of evil spirits.
Flour brought from a mill, especially one owned by a Turk, must be fumigated, in order
to prevent the Devil from entering into it. (ST. CLAIR and BROPHY, Bulgaria, p. 46;
TYLOR, P.C., Vol. II, p. 146).
Mimas: Class. Myth. A giant who, warring against the gods, was killed by lightning.
Mimer: Norse Legend. A smith who reared Siegfried and incited him to slay Fafnir.
(ii) Another spelling for Mimir.
Mimi: In the "Ring of the Nibelungen" he is the smith who aids Siegfried to win the ring,
and is slain by the hero for his treachery. Miming: Teut. Myth. A forest spirit, the guardian of a powerful sword. Mimir: Norse Myth. A giant whose abode is a spring flowing from the root of the world-
ash Yggdrasil. Drinking the waters of the spring, he knows all the past and the future.
This was the water-spirit, into whose waters Odin had put his eye in pledge, in order towin wisdom.

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Mythology Encyclopedia 146

quoting EIJUB ABELA in Zeitschrift des deutschen Paldstina-Vereins, VII (1885), p. II,).
The Guayquiris of Orinoco think that, when a woman has her period, everything upon
which she steps will die, and that if a man treads on the place where she has passed,
his legs will immediately swell up. (FRAZER, lb.)
In Brunswick people think that if a menstruous woman assists at the killing of a pig, the
pork will putrefy. (R. ANDREE, Braunschweiger Volkskunde, p. 291);
In the Greek island of Calymnos, it is believed that the presence of a menstruous
woman in a boat will raise storms. (W. R. PATON in Folklore, I (1890), p. 524).
According to Pliny, the touch of a menstruous woman turned wine to vinegar, blighted
crops, killed seedlings, blunted swords and razors, killed bees, brought down the fruit
from trees, caused mares to miscarry, and so forth. (PLINY, Nat. Hist., VII, 64sq., XXVIII,
77sq.)
Menstrual blood is believed to be a powerful means of inspiring love. (PLoss, Das
Weib, Vol. I, p. 444) ; cf. Ethnologie du Bengale, p. 79; JOLLY, Medicin, (Grundr. d.
Indo-Ar. Phil.), p. 50 VAN WATERS MIRIAM, The Adolescent Girl among Primitive
Peoples, p. 23 ; L. K. A. K. IVER, The Cochin Tribes and Castes, Vol. I, p. 203. Vide
Barrenness.
Mephistopheles: It is the name by which the Devil is called in Goethe’s Faust and in
Marlow’s Life and Death of Dr. Faustus.
Mer: Babyl. Myth. Another name for Adad.
Mercury: Rom. Myth. Son of Zeus, messenger of the Gods, and himself a god of commerce,
gain and eloquence. His worship was introduced into Rome from Southern Italy
as early as 495 B.C.
Mermaid: An imaginary species of beings supposed to inhabit the sea; they have the
head and trunk of a woman, the lower limbs being replaced by the tail of a fish, and are
often confused with the Sirens of Classical mythology. (LEHMANN, A.Z., p. 15; BARING-
GOULD, Cur. Myths., p. 508; CONWAY, Demonol., Vol. II, p. 218; THORPE, N.M.,
Vol. II, pp. 27, 28, 173; BASSETT, p. 171 et seq.)
If a fisherman meets a mermaid, he will catch no fish that day. (THORPE, op. Cit., p.
76).
Merman: The male counterpart of a mermaid.
Merrow: Irish Lore. A mermaid.
Meteor: Falling stars, eclipses, comets and other signs in the heavens portend the
death or fall of princes. (LEHMANN).
Midas: Gr. Myth. A king of Phrygia, who obtained from Bacchus the power of changing
everything he touched into gold. Even his food was changed into this metal the
moment he touched it. To cure him of this marvellous and fearful power, the god made

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